Ride the Wild Horse Meditation Transcripts

Transcripts of the Audio Meditations


Ride the Wild Horse – Beginning Meditation

Relax to wake up

Hello I'm Jeanne Segal, and I want to welcome you to the beginning of the Ride the Wild Horse mindfulness meditation.

Begin to relax by taking a slow, deep breath in and just as slowly breathing out. Take another leisurely full breath, this time paying attention to the movement in your chest and belly while you breathe in and out. Take three more slow breaths, paying attention to how much movement you can experience as you inhale deeply and exhale even more deeply.

Sit comfortably on your “sit bones” with your back and arms supported as you continue breathing deeply. Clear your mind of thoughts and focus your attention on your right hand. Slowly make a tight fist, hold. . . slowly let go, noticing the sensations in the skin, muscles, and joints in your palm, wrist, and each finger. Further relax and direct your breath to your hand and focus on the sensations you discover in your right hand.

Focus on your right arm. Gradually tighten the muscles in your upper and lower arm, hold . . . let go. Relax and direct your breath to your arm focusing on sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your right arm.

Focus next on your left hand. Slowly make a tight fist, hold . . . let go, noticing the sensations in the skin, muscles, and joints of your hand. Direct your breath to your left hand and focus on the sensations you discover in the palm, wrist, and each finger of your left hand.

Focus on your left arm. Gradually tighten the muscles in your upper and lower arm, hold . . . let go. Relax and imagine your breath entering and leaving your left arm, focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscle, and bones of your left arm.

Next, focus on your right foot and ankle, gradually lifting up the toes of your right foot, hold . . . let go. Relax as you continue breathing and imagine your breath penetrating the muscles and bones of your relaxed right foot while you focus on the sensations you discover in your right foot and ankle.

Focus on the calf and thigh of your right leg. Squeeze your calf and thigh muscles, hold . . . let go—breathing into the skin, muscles, and bones, focusing on the sensations you discover in your right leg. Do you feel a difference between your right and left leg? The more you melt, relax, and let go, the more feeling sensation you can become aware of experiencing.

Now focus on your left foot and ankle while you gradually lift up all the toes on your left foot, hold . . . let go. Imagine your breath penetrating the muscles and bones in your left foot and ankle—melting, further relaxing as you focus on the sensations you discover in your left foot and ankle.

Focus on the calf and thigh of your left leg. Squeeze your calf and thigh muscles, hold . . . let go, breathing into the muscles and bones focusing on the sensations you experience in your left leg.

Next, focus on your pelvis, stomach, and lower back. Slowly tighten and squeeze your pelvis, stomach, and lower back, hold . . . let go. Relax and imagine that your breath is directed into these parts allowing your body to further dissolve, while you focus on the sensations you discover in the muscles and organs in your pelvis, stomach, and lower back.

Focus now on your chest and upper back. Tighten the muscles in your chest and upper back, hold . . . let go. Direct your breath into the muscles and organs, including your heart and lungs. Let your rib cage and back melt and relax as you focus on the sensations you discover in your chest and upper back.

Focus on your neck, the back of your head, and shoulders. Very gradually drop your head toward your chest—hold . . . and slowly lift your head up. Now, slowly raise your shoulders toward your ears—hold . . . and let your shoulders slowly drop . . . further relaxing, imagine your breath moving through your neck and shoulders as you focus on sensations you discover.

Finally, gradually tense the back of your head and face. Include your forehead, jaw, and the muscles around your eyes, nose, and mouth. Hold . . . let go. Imagine your breath further melting and relaxing the skin and muscles in your head and face while you focus on the sensations you discover, including those in the back of your head, your jaw, forehead, and the muscles around your eyes, nose, and mouth.

Beginning meditation

You are now going to explore the beginning meditation.

As you continue breathing fully and deeply, begin focusing on each part of your body from the toes up or head down—whichever you prefer. Pay attention to what you discover in the skin, muscles, and organs throughout your body.

If at some point the scanning process becomes emotionally unpleasant, open your eyes and employ quick stress relief to bring your stress into balance, before returning to the meditation. Continue slowly scanning your body, becoming aware of the feeling sensations you discover until you hear my voice again in about five minutes.

(Five minutes of accompanying music)

Ending

Open your eyes wide, stand up, stamp your feet, shake your hands and arms. Focus on what I am saying to you rather than what you’re feeling.

Making the shift from an internal focus to an external focus is a very important part of the process. You were paying attention to the feelings in your body—now pay attention to your surroundings. You don't have to stop feeling to do this, just stop focusing on what you're feeling and instead redirect your focused attention to the world around you.

Don't forget to talk to another person today or tomorrow about what this experience was like for you.

Finally, keep practicing this meditation until you can easily identify feeling sensations throughout your body.

Ride the Wild Horse – Intermediate Meditation

Relax to wake up

Welcome to the intermediate experience of the Ride the Wild Horse meditation.

Now take three slow, deep breaths, paying attention to how much movement you experience in your chest and belly as you deeply inhale and exhale even more deeply.

Sit comfortably on your sit bones, with your back and arms supported as you continue breathing deeply. Clear your mind of thoughts and focus on your right hand slowly making a tight fist, hold . . . let go. Direct your breath into your right hand, focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your right hand.

Focus on your right arm, gradually tightening the muscles in your upper and lower-arm, hold . . . let go. Directing your breath into your right arm, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your right arm.

Now focus now on your left hand. Slowly make a tight fist, hold . . . let go. Breathe into your left hand, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your left hand.

Focus on your left arm, gradually tightening the muscles of your upper and lower-arm, hold . . . let go. Imagining your breath entering your left arm as you relax it and focus on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your left arm.

Focus now on your right foot and ankle, gradually lifting all the toes of your right foot up, hold . . . let go, relax, and breathe into the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones of your right foot.

Focus on your right leg and slowly squeeze the calf and thigh muscles of your right leg, hold . . . let go. Breathe into your right leg, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones of your right leg.

Now focus on your left foot and ankle, gradually lifting all the toes of your left foot up, hold . . . let go, melting and relaxing as you breathe into the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones of your left foot.

Focus on your left leg, squeezing the calf and thigh muscles, hold . . . let go. Breathe into your left leg, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones in your left leg.

Focus now on your pelvis, stomach, and lower back, squeeze and hold . . . let go. Relax and breathe into the sensations you discover in the muscles and organs in your stomach, pelvis, and lower back.

Next, focus on your rib cage and upper back. Squeeze and hold . . . let go. Relax your rib cage and back as you breathe and focus on the sensations you discover in the muscles and organs in your chest . . . and upper back.

Finally, gradually tense the back of your neck, head, and face. Include your forehead, jaw, and the many muscles around your eyes, nose, and mouth, hold . . . let go, experiencing the sensations you discover in the skin and muscles in your neck, head, and face.

Intermediate meditation

You are now going to further explore physical and emotional sensations in your body.

Continue breathing deeply and scan your body from head to toe or toe to head, whichever you prefer. As you explore, experience your moment-to-moment physical and emotional sensations.

Moving from one place in your body to another, look for a feeling sensation that is stronger or different. This area might be warmer, cooler, tighter, or more “prickly” than others. The sensation might even stand out because it's numb and lacks feeling.

This different or unusual sensation can be anywhere—your legs, stomach, shoulders, or jaw. When you locate the feeling, direct your breath into your moment-to-moment experience. Feel the sensation without thinking about it at all.

If the sensation becomes emotionally uncomfortable, open your eyes and use the sensory skills you developed practicing quick stress relief to bring yourself back into balance, before returning to the meditation. Focus internally, looking for places in your body that hold stronger or different sensations, and continue breathing slowly and deeply until you hear my voice again in approximately nine minutes.

(Nine minutes of accompanying music.)

Ending

Open your eyes wide, stand up, stamp your feet, shake your hands and arms. Focus on your surroundings rather than on your internal feelings. Notice that even though you may still be sad, hurt, or angry, colors may be brighter, sounds clearer, and you may feel more energized. You’re more relaxed and alert.

Distressing emotions may stay with you for a while, but they won’t interfere with your life—provided that you don’t think about them. Making the shift from an internal to an external focus is a very important part of the process. You were just paying attention to your feelings, now pay attention to your surroundings. You won't have to stop feeling to do this, just stop focusing on what you're feeling, and instead redirect your focused attention to the world around you.

Don't forget to talk to another person today or tomorrow about the experience you’ve just had.

Finally, keep practicing this meditation until you can comfortably identify stronger emotions or feelings that stand out in your body.

Ride the Wild Horse – Deeper Meditation

Relax to wake up

Welcome back to a deeper experience of the Ride the Wild Horse mindfulness meditation.

Now take three slow, deep breaths, paying attention to how much movement you experience in your chest and belly as you deeply inhale and exhale even more deeply.

Sit comfortably on your sit bones with your back and arms supported as you continue breathing deeply. Clear your mind of thoughts and focus on your right hand, slowly making a tight fist, hold . . . let go. Direct your breath into your right hand, focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your right hand.

Focus on your right arm, gradually tightening the muscles in your upper and lower arm, hold . . . let go. Directing your breath into your right arm, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your right arm.

Now focus now on your left hand. Slowly make a tight fist, hold . . . let go. Breathe into your left hand, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your left hand.

Focus on your left arm, gradually tightening the muscles of your upper and lower arm, hold . . . let go. Imagining your breath entering your left arm as you relax it and focus on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your left arm.

Focus now on your right foot and ankle, gradually lifting all the toes of your right foot up, hold . . . let go, relax and breathe into the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones of your right foot.

Focus on your right leg and slowly squeeze the calf and thigh muscles of your right leg, hold . . . let go. Breathe into your right leg, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones of your right leg.

Now focus on your left foot and ankle, gradually lifting all the toes of your left foot up, hold . . . let go, melting and relaxing as you breathe into the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones of your left foot.

Focus on your left leg, squeezing the calf and thigh muscles, hold . . . let go. Breathe into your left leg, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the muscles and bones in your left leg.

Focus now on your pelvis, stomach, and lower back, squeeze and hold . . . let go. Relax and breathe into the sensations you discover in the muscles and organs in your stomach, pelvis, and lower back.

Next, focus on your rib cage and upper back. Squeeze and hold . . . let go. Relax your rib cage and back as you breathe and focus on the sensations you discover in the muscles and organs in your chest . . . and upper back.

Finally, gradually tense the back of your neck, head, and face. Include your forehead, jaw, and the many muscles around your eyes, nose, and mouth. Hold . . . let go, experiencing the sensations you discover in the skin and muscles in your neck, head, and face.

Deeper meditation

You are now going to explore the deeper meditation.

If you are feeling mild emotional distress, focus on these feelings as your point of departure. Or you can very briefly recall a recent experience where you reacted with mild irritation. Perhaps you missed a bus or spilled a drink. Focus on the feeling sensations of mild distress. Allow yourself to experience and accept these sensations.

Continue breathing slowly and deeply as you scan your body from head to toe or toe to head, whichever you prefer, allowing yourself to feel the physical and emotional sensations. Focus internally and find the place in your body with the strongest sensation. Perhaps it's your stomach, back, shoulders, or jaw. When you locate this spot, direct your breath to your moment-to-moment experience in this part of your body. Focus on the feeling, not your thoughts.

Your attention may wander, but each time this happens, gently bring it back to the place in your body that you are focusing on. Be gentle and patient with yourself, even if you become distracted again and again.

You may find it helpful to imagine that as your breath goes in and out, it’s carrying the message, “Permit the sensation,” or “Allow the sensation.”

If you begin to feel uncomfortable, open your eyes and use the sensory skills you developed practicing quick stress relief to calm and focus yourself before going back to the meditation. Continue riding the experience until you hear my voice again in about 14 minutes.

(14 minutes of accompanying music)

Ending

Open your eyes wide, stand up, stamp your feet, shake your hands and arms. Focus on your surroundings rather than on your internal feelings. Notice that even though you may still be sad, hurt, or angry, colors may be brighter, sounds clearer, and you may feel more energized. You’re more relaxed and alert.

Distressing emotions may stay with you for a while, but they won’t interfere with your life—provided that you don’t think about them. Making the shift from an internal to an external focus is a very important part of the process. You were just paying attention to your feelings, now pay attention to your surroundings. You won't have to stop feeling to do this; just stop focusing on what you're feeling and redirect your attention to the world around you. There is no benefit to spending more time exclusively focusing internally.

Don't forget to talk to another person today or tomorrow about the experience you just had. And appreciate yourself for having the courage and tenacity to do this work.

Finally, keep practicing this meditation until you are completely confident of your ability to remain calm and focused in uncomfortable and mildly stressful situations.

Ride the Wild Horse – Deepest Meditation

Relax to wake up

Welcome back to the deepest experience of the Ride the Wild Horse meditation.

Take three slow, deep breaths, paying attention to how much movement you experience in your chest and belly as you deeply inhale and exhale even more deeply.

Sit comfortably on your sit bones with your back and arms supported as you continue breathing deeply. Clear your mind of thoughts and focus on your right hand, slowly making a tight fist. Hold . . . let go. Direct your breath into your right hand, focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your right hand.

Focus on your right arm, gradually tightening the muscles in your upper and lower arm. Hold . . . let go. Directing your breath into your right arm, relaxing and focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your right arm.

Focus now on your left hand. Slowly make a tight fist. Hold . . . let go, breathing into your left hand, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your left hand.

Focus on your left arm, gradually tightening the muscles of your upper and lower arm. Hold . . . let go, imagining your breath entering your left arm as you relax and focus on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your left arm.

Focus now on your right foot and ankle, gradually lifting all the toes of your right foot up. Hold . . . let go, relax, and direct your breath into the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your right foot.

Focus on your right leg and slowly squeeze the calf and thigh muscles of your right leg. Hold . . . let go, breathing into your right leg, relaxing it and focusing on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones of your right leg.

Focus now on your left foot and ankle, gradually lifting all the toes of your left foot. Hold . . . let go, melting and relaxing as you direct your breath into the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints of your left foot.

Focus on your left leg and, squeezing the calf and thigh muscles, hold . . . let go, breathing into your left leg, relaxing it and focusing of the sensations you discover in in the skin, muscles, and bones in your left leg.

Focus now on your pelvis, stomach, and lower back. Hold . . . let go. Relax and breathe into the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and organs in your stomach . . . pelvis . . . and lower back.

Next, focus on your rib cage and upper back. Hold . . . let go. Relax your rib cage and back as you breathe and focus on the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, bones, and organs in your chest . . . and upper back.

Finally, gradually tense the back of your neck, head, and face. Include your forehead, jaw, and the many muscles around your eyes, nose, and mouth. Hold . . . let go, experiencing the sensations you discover in the skin, muscles, and bones in your neck . . . head . . . and face.

Deepest meditation

You are going to explore the deepest meditation.

Continue breathing slowly and deeply. If you are feeling emotional distress, focus on these feelings for your point of departure. Or you can very briefly recall a distressing experience to prime an emotion you want to address. Scan your body for the exact spot that holds the strongest sensation. It may be any part, including your legs, stomach, chest, or face.

When you locate this spot, direct your breath into it, allowing the experience to deepen and intensify. If the feeling becomes uncomfortably strong, open your eyes and use the sensory skills you developed practicing quick stress relief, before continuing the meditation.

Your attention may wander but each time this happens gently bring it back to the place in your body that feels the most intense. Be gentle and patient with yourself, even if you frequently become distracted.

If a feeling moves from one place to another, direct your attention to the part of your body with the strongest sensation.

If, as you approach a sensation, you go numb, experience the emptiness and let this feeling of emptiness become your focus of attention.

You may find it helpful to imagine that your breath carries the message, “Permit the sensation,” or “Allow the sensation.” You may want to notice if a strong emotion seems familiar, if you’ve felt this way before? If you have, you may ask, “How old is this sensation? How often do I feel this way?” Don’t analyze, just notice and immediately go back to focusing on your experience.

Remember, you can always open your eyes and use the sensory means you discovered practicing quick stress relief to calm and center yourself before going on with the meditation.

Focus on what you're feeling internally and ride the experience until you hear my voice again in about 20 minutes.

(20 minutes of accompanying music)

Ending

Open your eyes wide, stand up, stamp your feet, shake your hands and arms. Focus on your surroundings rather than on your internal feelings. Notice that even though you may still be sad, hurt, or angry, colors may be brighter, sounds clearer, and you may feel more energized. You’re more relaxed and alert.

Distressing emotions may stay with you for a while, but they won’t interfere with your life—provided that you don’t think about them. Making the shift from an internal to an external focus is a very important part of the process. You were just paying attention to your feelings, now pay attention to your surroundings. You won't have to stop feeling to do this, just stop focusing on what you're feeling and redirect your attention to the world around you. There is no benefit to spending more time exclusively focusing internally.

Don't forget to talk to another person today or tomorrow about the experience you’ve just had. And appreciate yourself for having the courage and commitment to do this important work for your own sake, and the sake of others.

Keep practicing this meditation until you are comfortable experiencing strong emotions in a variety of settings.

Last Updated: July 2014

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